Commit 4f98bf03 authored by Lee Kimber's avatar Lee Kimber
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Fixes mylknikovdm translation repeat

parent c6375202
title: Another history of the Earth - Part 1 and
date: 2017-04-16
modified: 2021-08-11 19:07:33
modified: 2021-09-12 21:23:50
category:
tags: catastrophe
slug:
......@@ -98,7 +98,7 @@ That is where I want to end the answers to the first block of the most frequentl
In the previous parts I described only the impact itself and the accompanying processes that took place immediately after the disaster. But after the passage of shock and inertial waves that formed the waters of the world's oceans, the disasters did not end there. Indeed, at the place of impact, a giant Tamu volcano, about 500x1000 km in size, was formed, and several hundred volcanoes simultaneously activated or re-formed along the Pacific coast and along the internal faults of the earth's crust at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean. And since most of them, especially at the initial moment, were at the bottom of the ocean, including the Tamu massif, the water of the world ocean should have begun to flood these volcanoes, which should have led to the intense evaporation of a huge amount of water. That is, in our country the water, air and temperature balances in the atmosphere are sharply violated. Due to the high temperature of the magma with which the water is in contact, not just steam will be formed, but highly superheated steam, which will then rise to the upper atmosphere, heating them, and also increasing the pressure in the area above the volcanoes. The consequence of this should be hurricane winds, which will equalize the pressure, as well as prolonged heavy rains, since we have formed an excess of moisture in the atmosphere.
Further, during the eruption of volcanoes, not only a lot of evaporating water will enter the atmosphere, but also a huge amount of ash and oxides of those minerals that make up molten magma flowing from volcanoes. The most interesting thing is that contact with the water of the world's oceans will intensify the process of formation of small solid particles, which will rise together with steam and heated air into the upper atmosphere, and then be carried over great distances. At the point of contact with water, a zone of intense cooling and crystallization of magma will form, which, due to temperature compression, will here be covered with microcracks and disintegrate into small particles. In this case, the smallest particles will be picked up by superheated air and steam and rise to the upper atmosphere, where they will form a dust layer, and large ones will fall back. That is, we get a kind of separator that will separate the formed particles into fractions, while the smallest particles will rise to a great height. This dust can then be carried by winds for many thousands of kilometers, until conditions are formed that will cause this dust to fall back to the Earth's surface. It is most likely that this can happen when a dust cloud meets a cloud of water vapor, as a result of which we start to have not just rains, but mud rains, including those flooding cities with layers of clay. which will cause this dust to fall back to the Earth's surface. It is most likely that this can happen when a dust cloud meets a cloud of water vapor, as a result of which we start to have not just rains, but mud rains, including those flooding cities with layers of clay. which will cause this dust to fall back to the Earth's surface. It is most likely that this can happen when a dust cloud meets a cloud of water vapor, as a result of which we start to have not just rains, but mud rains, including those flooding cities with layers of clay.
Further, during the eruption of volcanoes, not only a lot of evaporating water will enter the atmosphere, but also a huge amount of ash and oxides of those minerals that make up molten magma flowing from volcanoes. The most interesting thing is that contact with the water of the world's oceans will intensify the process of formation of small solid particles, which will rise together with steam and heated air into the upper atmosphere, and then be carried over great distances. At the point of contact with water, a zone of intense cooling and crystallization of magma will form, which, due to temperature compression, will here be covered with microcracks and disintegrate into small particles. In this case, the smallest particles will be picked up by superheated air and steam and rise to the upper atmosphere, where they will form a dust layer, and large ones will fall back. That is, we get a kind of separator that will separate the formed particles into fractions, while the smallest particles will rise to a great height. This dust can then be carried by winds for many thousands of kilometers, until conditions are formed that will cause this dust to fall back to the Earth's surface. It is most likely that this can happen when a dust cloud meets a cloud of water vapor, as a result of which we start to have not just rains, but mud rains, including those flooding cities with layers of clay.
It should be borne in mind that while the primary catastrophe passed relatively quickly, the impact itself within tens of minutes and the passing of air and water waves for several hours, the volcanic eruptions could have continued for many years and the fallout of dust and water lifted into the atmosphere could have continued for even longer.
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